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Dedication

Dedication

         Roberts, Borders, Mauneys, Howells, Briggs and Related Families

     Descendents of the seven daughters of slave Silvy Fulenwilder of :Lincolnton, North Carolina began recording their genealogy  in 1906. They have met annually ever since without faiil to celebrate the heritage of  families descended from Silvy,  believed to have been the daughter of a village chieftain. in Guinea, Africa in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Silvy’s descendents suffered through as many as five generations of  American slavery in North Carolina before the Civil War freed them.. My grandfather, Clifton Bruce Whitworth, was in the first generation of  his maternal line to be born free.  Due to the family’s long-standing preservation of records, I can identify the four generations of my grandfather’s slave ancesters up to and including Silvy.

       Daddy Bruce’s father, George William Whitworth, was a slave until liberated by the Civil War at the age of  about twenty-two. His family may have been slaves of  Baptist minister Thomas Dixon, Sr of Shelby, North Carolina whose son, Thomas Dixon, Jr., a staunch  white supremacist, authored the book The Clansman, on which D. W. Griffith’s racist movie, Birth Of  Nation, was based. According to family lore, George William so detested his Dixon slaveowners that he chose the surname of a Fennel Whitworth, a kinder,  prior slaveowner.

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